Summer Reading List for Personal Finances

Summer Reading List for Personal FinancesSince it’s summer and reading lists are at the top of your mind, now’s the perfect time to expand your knowledge of money management and wealth building. So, whether you’re a retiree, a beginning saver, or even a child, we’ve got a book for you.

The Classics

If you haven’t had a chance to dive into these titles, you might want to grab them, starting with The Millionaire Next Door. Authors Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko published this in 1996 and learned something critical: most millionaires were those who don’t blatantly flash their wealth but live below their means and save, save, save. Other great books like The Psychology of Money and Same As Ever, both by Morgan Housel, explore how human emotions trigger spending decisions that aren’t always the best for us. (Not surprising, right?) Finally, The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham advocates a “disciplined approach to investing.” He’s someone who you might want to listen to – he was a mentor to Warren Buffet.

New Books

For those who want to align their personal values with their financial decisions, The Social Justice Investor by Andrea Longton is a good read. Her thesis is simple: she reminds us that no matter how big or small, every investment impacts humanity. Another new book by an author who has a big presence on social media, Kyla Scanlon, is In This Economy? How Money and Markets Really Work. Using the model of short, bite-sized clips made famous by TikTok, she presents macroeconomic concepts like interest rates in digestible chunks. Even if you’re not into the socials, you can glean important fiduciary principles in a short time – especially if you have a busy life.

For Young Folks

Check out this powerful title, Stop Acting Rich…and Start Living like a Real Millionaire, also by Thomas J. Stanley. In a nutshell, this is a cautionary tale that details the pitfalls of overspending on a house or other major purchases while also emphasizing that just because you look rich doesn’t mean you are. Another great pick is Financially Stupid People are Everywhere – Don’t Be One of Them by Jason Kelly. This narrative shines the spotlight on dangers that parents might not discuss with their kids, such as consumer debt and large mortgages. It shares how “not to be a sucker.”

For Students and Kiddos

This is a long one: Debt Free U – How I Paid for an Outstanding College Education Without Loans, Scholarships or Mooching Off My Parents by Zac Bissonnette. According to the reviews, the story is motivating and inspiring for high school students and does an excellent job of paying off the title. For younger children, there is Lily Learns About Wants and Needs by Lisa Bullard, who reads it weekly to her kids. In her story, she focuses on gratitude and succeeds in explaining that “budgeting” isn’t negative but a necessity for success. From the sounds of this narrative, other age groups might benefit from it, as well.

These are just a few books you can pack into your suitcase or beach bag this summer. If you don’t finish them, you can take them with you for the rest of the year. Learning how to be smart about your finances never goes out of season.

Sources

Personal-Finance Books to Put on Your Summer Reading List (msn.com)


Disclaimer 

Please follow and like us:

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.